Friday, March 21, 2014

Play it Again Onions

On  a recent trip to the Hope Farmer's Market, I saw the most beautiful green onions at the Yard to Market booth. The tops were beautiful, but what really caught my attention were the fabulous roots. I knew these onions would be perfect for a little experiment that I have been wanting to try.


Did you know that you can re-grow green onions and have fresh clippings on hand whenever you need them? Well, you can. Re-growing onions is both fun and frugal. I tried a similar experiment with celery, which you can read about in my blog, Magic Celery. The celery experiment worked great, so I'm pretty excited to see what happens with the onions.

To get started, simply cut the green tops off of the onions and reserve them for your favorite recipe. For this experiment, we'll only need the bulby bottoms.


Grab yourself a pot or a nice patch of ground and space out some holes for each of the onions. I found my gloved finger made the perfect sized hole.


Plant each onion root, leaving the top poking up out of the soil. Water well and place in a sunny spot.


In just three days, noticeable sprouts will begin to form.


In know time at all I'll have a wonderful harvest of green onions for soups, baked potatoes and salads. Give it a try!





9 comments:

  1. I've heard of this method for growing green onion before. The next time I'm at the Farmers Market I'll have to purchase some organic green onions and give it a try. Thanks for the inspiration!

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    1. From what I've seen on the web, the grocery store versions work too. I'd just look for a bunch with the best roots even if they are cut real short.

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  2. An interesting experiment. I have some of those multiplying onions which grow profusely making new bulbs all around the plant. The only problem I have found with them is that they are rather strong flavored. Cooking reduces their pungent flavor. I am going to try regrowing some of my spring onion roots as you suggest.

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  3. I just bought some, and i'm going to try this! They're organic, but the roots aren't nearly as developed. I don't usually use the end anyway, so it won't hurt to give it a whirl. Thanks for the idea!

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  4. What an excellent idea! Than you for sharing it. I will most certainly try it.

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  5. If you want a bigger bunch for a start then just let me know and I'll bring you some at the next get together. I have mass quantities of them. They have been in my family for decades.

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    1. I'd love that Bob. That would be great!

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  6. Ally, I enjoyed "meeting" you and touring your garden on CTG.

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    1. So glad you got to see the show! The Central Texas Gardener camara guys have a wonderful eye and the producer put it all together beautifully. It was a lot of fun to do.

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