Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Tonka Tour

Did you ever have your very own Tonka truck?  I never did.  I was Tonka deprived as a youth, but I'm making up for it now.  I purchased my very own second-hand Tonka truck and for just a few dollars, I made a very cool toy fit for the most discerning gardener.  Here's my Tonka truck garden just after completion.


After constructing Tonka, I thought, what the heck, let's go for a spin.  First stop, the Chick Inn.  Hmmm... I guess the chicks are out gallivanting. 

I kinda see why 5 years boys like these Tonka trucks.  My Tonka is king of it's little garden world.  Let's cross the bridge and go check out the watermelon patch.


My garden pond doubles as a huge lake in Tonka's world.

Driving a Tonka truck around is exhausting.  I  think it's time to find a place to park, after all, I'm not 5 years old anymore.  I thought this spot next to my new Sharkskin Agave and Bronze Dyckia would be good, but it doesn't really show Tonka off to her best advantage.

Ah, this is perfect.  The yellow pansies really bring out the color in her chassis.  

I hope you'll consider having a little fun with your garden containers.  If a yellow Tonka truck isn't really your style.  Consider this adorable plastic pail potted up with purple Angelonia.

Or, grab an old red wagon and use your imagination.  Do you see a moss covered fairy land or a desert oasis full of cactus?  It's all child's play.  Have fun!





23 comments:

  1. Love your 'Adventures with Tonka'. Great job planting, too. I just finished planting a succulent scaped antique red wagon, incorporating rocks and a tiny, very realistic horned toad. Such fun and I like the whimsy in the garden.

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    1. I'd love to see you antique red wagon. I'm still trying to decide what to do with mine.

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  2. That is just too cute! I need to do something my husband's and children's old Radio Flyer--thanks for the inspiration!

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    1. I pulled my son's little red wagon out to consider what I might plant in it. Wouldn't you know I started using it in the garden. Radio Flyers are the toy that keeps on giving.

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  3. Very Cute! I love the Tonka truck! It looks great and the plants you selected are fabulous. Nicely Done!

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    1. I had a great time shopping for the plants at East Austin Succulents. I selected plants that don't require much moisture, because Tonka does not hold water very well.

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  4. How fun! I never had my own Tonka. But, with a little boy around (long ago), there were plenty of them to stumble over. Should have held onto one..or two.
    I love ALL your containers. And, the Chick Inn....that's cute.

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    1. Everything old is new again (or so I've heard). People get big bucks for those vintage Tonka's, though mine is a simple $5 yard sale model.

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  5. Hey Ally - love the Tonka Truck - great job. I need to get me a truck and wagon too - great ideas for unusual garden planters.

    Maybe we can take a spin into one of the local Goodwill resale stores and find other interesting stuff for planters!

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  6. Sounds like a great idea. I bet we'd find some cool stuff at Goodwill.

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  7. There is ALWAYS good stuff at Goodwill! I'm in! Really cute idea, Ally.

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    1. That is so true; there's lots of good stuff a Goodwill. You just have to think outside the box and figure out ways to re-purpose things. Next time I visit Goodwill, I'd love to have you and your creative eyes along.

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  8. I absolutely love this idea! Mind if I steal it???

    Laura

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    1. Go for it! It's a fun project. I'd love to see yours when your done.

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  9. Fun post. Enjoyed the truck ride around the garden. It all looks so lovely. By the way, you should write a children's book!

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    1. Interestingly, I wrote my first children's book when I was in the 3rd grade. It was called the "Skinny Robber and Sheriff Big B". It has zero chance of being published, but someday when I have more time, maybe I'll make a more serious attempt.

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  10. What a delightful tour! Imagination in the garden is a wonderful thing.

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    1. I'm so glad you enjoyed the tour. Thanks for stopping by.

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  11. Cute!
    CIndy S.

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  12. Love this upcycling idea (though my young son would think it blasphemy to take a perfectly good truck...) :). Wondered since your'e in the same climate I am if you've had experience with clay pot irrigation. Dripping Springs OLLAS are local to us & have caught my eye. Wondered if you've got feedback or would ever explore this as a topic. I'm so keen to learn better ways to save water around here, & they seem to be a good option.

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    1. I use drip irrigation to conserve water. My garden is too big to make ollas an effective choice, but I do know people who use them. Have you ever heard of keyhole gardens. This style of garden is supposed to be very good for water conservation. Here's a link to get you started: http://gardenally.blogspot.com/2012/08/a-hill-country-keyhole-garden.html

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