Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Hey Bud!

At the end of winter, when the buds swell, I start watching for signs that the trees and other plants are breaking dormancy.  As each successive plant buds out, it's hard not to get excited and spring fever takes hold of my brain.

I live in an area of Texas called the Post Oak Savannah.  My 2 acre home site is generously covered with Black Jack Oak, Cedar Elm, and of course, Post Oak.  I think this particular Post Oak has flower envy.

This is a Shumard Red Oak in the early stages of leafing out.  Known for their fall foliage, the spring foliage isn’t shabby either.


I added two Forest Pansy Redbud trees to my landscape last year.  The delicate pinkish, purple flowers are followed by the heart-shaped purple leaves that make this tree very striking. 

My Mountain Laurel is absolutely dripping with flowers this year.  The flowers feel like silk and have a wonderful fragrance that floats in the air.  

Chinese Wisteria is an aggressive vine that should be grown with care.  My best advice is to keep it pruned and provide a strong support.  I'll have more pictures of this plant in the next couple of weeks as it fills my arbor with massive quantities of flowers.  The picture below is of a smaller plant that I'm growing in a pot as I attempt to train it into a topiary form.

This Blue Ajuga was just planted last summer, but it's already putting out plenty of those great sapphire blue flowers that I love. 

Rainbow Ajuga doesn't have fancy flowers, but it's attractive foliage provides interest all year long.  

This Spring Bouquet Viburnum is a new addition to my garden.  In fact, this guy is still in it's pot.  I wanted to be sure I got the right plant this time.  Years ago I accidentally picked up a misnamed pretender that never bloomed.  Well, the non-bloomer is on it's way out and this beauty is moving in.  

This foxy lady is called Hot Lips Salvia.  Hmmm... I wonder why?

Another new additional to my garden is this orange Globe Mallow.  I first read about this plant on a fellow bloggers site and knew I had to have one.  The color combination of the silvery gray with the bright orange flowers is brilliant.

It wouldn't be Spring without rose buds.  I gave most of my roses a very hard pruning just weeks ago.  While they're putting out new growth for a late Spring show, I'll enjoy this lovely Knockout Rose.  



15 comments:

  1. How bad does the wisteria spread? Is there a less aggressive form? I've always wanted to grow it and I have a new metal arbor just begging for some drippy purple blooms...

    And i'm happy to see you joined the globemallow bandwagon! it's one of my favorites.

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    1. Wisteria Sinensis has a tendency to sucker and any of the vining stems that touch the ground will eventually root. It's manageable with pruning. The Texas Wisteria (Wisteria macrostachya) is another option. I have not grown this one though. If you decide to grow W. Sinensis, I can give you a plant. I dug up some plants last year and they are still in pots. I hate to throw anything away.

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  2. Newly opening leaves are really under appreciated, as you have shown. I was so glad to read about the mallow last year because now I have one too. In fact I have two, the orange and the pink.

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    1. I was so amazed at how much those new leaves looked like flowers. Now I find myself looking harder for something interesting I might be missing. I think the mallows are going to be a big hit. I hope the nurseries are stocking up.

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  3. There's just nothing like spring and her accompanying buds to bring joy and energy to me--and everyone else! Great shots and enjoy this lovely time.

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    1. With more rain forecasted, I think this spring is shaping up to be a good one with lots of green and lots of flowers. We deserve it! I plan on soaking it up.

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  4. So many beautiful things blooming there.

    My mother always had wisteria. She kept it pruned in a shrub form. It looked like a big ball of purple in the spring.

    Once years ago, I saw a wisteria growing at Natural Gardener, with dark purple flowers....gorgeous. I can't remember what kind it was, and don't know if it's still there. It wasn't the Chinese form, and I think was supposed to be less invasive.

    I do like that globe mallow. Another one for 'the list'.

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    1. I have seen people grow wisteria in a shrub form, on a fence and most commonly on a trellis. It's a pretty versatile plant. There's Chinese Wisteria, Japanese Wisteria, and the Texas Wisteria that I know of. I'm not sure about the growth habits of the others, but if you saw it at the Natural Gardener is was probably the Texas native.

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  5. I've never seen the globe mallow. That's lovely.
    Cindy S.

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    1. I only recently discovered the globe mallow myself. It seems like a pretty tough plant. I've heard lots of good things about it.

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  6. Gorgeous blooms there. I've always wanted to plant Blue Ajuga, but I'm not sure how it will perform during drought conditions. I love that Globe Mallow. I have to get me one of those:)

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    1. In a shady spot the Ajuga needs very little water once established. It's biggest enemy last summer was the armadillo that was convinced there were grubs or worms in it somewhere. Even after being dug up and left for dead on more than one occasion, they still survived.

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  7. Gorgeous pictures! Spring magic is just too wonderful! And I can tell you that I adore my 'Spring Bouquet' viburnums since I met them at Zilker Festival long ago. You will love them.

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    1. Thanks Linda. The Spring Bouquet Viburnum has been on my plant bucket list for years. I'm glad to finally add it to my collection.

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  8. Melanie here! I enjoyed this piece, please email me--I have a question about your blog. MelanieLBowen[at]gmail[dot]com

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